21 September 2012 To PLAnetary Transit or not? An extremely large field of view camera with a CaF2 component tested in thermo-vacuum
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Abstract
Because of its nicely chromatic behavior, Calcium Fluoride (CaF2) is a nice choice for an optical designer as it can easily solve a number of issues, giving the right extra degree of freedom in the optical design tuning. However, switching from tablet screens to real life, the scarcity of information -and sometimes the bad reputation in term of fragility- about this material makes an overall test much more than a "display determination" experiment. We describe the extensive tests performed in ambient temperature and in thermo-vacuum of a prototype, consistent with flight CTEs, of a 200mm class camera envisaged for the PLATO (PLAnetary Transit and Oscillations of Stars) mission. We show how the CaF2 lens uneventfully succeeded to all the tests and handling procedures, and discuss the main results of the very intensive test campaign of the PLATO Telescope Optical Unit prototype.
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M. Bergomi, M. Bergomi, D. Magrin, D. Magrin, J. Farinato, J. Farinato, V. Viotto, V. Viotto, R. Ragazzoni, R. Ragazzoni, A. Brunelli, A. Brunelli, M. Dima, M. Dima, P. Christiansen, P. Christiansen, M. Ghigo, M. Ghigo, D. Laubier, D. Laubier, H. Pasquier, H. Pasquier, D. Piazza, D. Piazza, I. Pagano, I. Pagano, G. Piotto, G. Piotto, G. Basile, G. Basile, C. Catala, C. Catala, } "To PLAnetary Transit or not? An extremely large field of view camera with a CaF2 component tested in thermo-vacuum", Proc. SPIE 8442, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 844249 (21 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926423; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.926423
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