8 March 2013 Optical coherence tomography demonstrates differential epidermal thinning of human forearm volar skin after 2 weeks application of a topical corticosteroid vs a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory alternative
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Abstract
The effects on skin of two commercially available topical creams for the treatment of eczema are quantitatively studied using optical coherence tomography. An archetypal corticosteroid (Betamethasone valerate) is compared with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (Tacrolimus monohydrate) via left/right comparisons of the epidermal thickness of volar forearm skin on selected volunteers, at baseline and after 14 days of treatment. In 3 of 4 subjects we confirmed previous observations that corticosteroids produce pronounced physical thinning of the epidermis over timescales of a few weeks. In 3 of 4 subjects we further found that Tacrolimus produced no change in epidermal thickness. In one of 4 subjects we found evidence that the epidermis was actually thickened following treatment using Tacrolimus.
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Zenghai Lu, Zenghai Lu, Joseph Boadi, Joseph Boadi, Simon Danby, Simon Danby, Michael Cork, Michael Cork, Stephen J. Matcher, Stephen J. Matcher, } "Optical coherence tomography demonstrates differential epidermal thinning of human forearm volar skin after 2 weeks application of a topical corticosteroid vs a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory alternative", Proc. SPIE 8565, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IX, 85650C (8 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2006104; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2006104
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