8 March 2013 Optical spectroscopy methods to probe key spectral fingerprints of animal bone
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Abstract
The chemical composition of different animal bones was studied using Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using a luminescence spectrometer, the fluorescence spectra from an excitation of 300 nm, 340 nm, 400 nm and 500 nm were investigated and showed the key molecular components of bone. After 300 nm excitation, 380 nm fluorescence was seen, consistent with the presence of collagen. After 340 nm excitation, 380 nm fluorescence was seen, consistent with the presence of collagen, the main organic material in bone. An excitation of 340 nm also showed a fluorescence of 450 nm, most likely due to the presence of NADH. After 500 nm excitation, 600 nm fluorescence was seen, most likely caused by porphyrins due to blood within the bone. Raman spectroscopy using a 785 nm laser was also performed. With these spectroscopic tools, the important features and components of bone can be studied.
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Diana C. Sordillo, Diana C. Sordillo, Laura A. Sordillo, Laura A. Sordillo, Peter P. Sordillo, Peter P. Sordillo, Robert Alfano, Robert Alfano, } "Optical spectroscopy methods to probe key spectral fingerprints of animal bone", Proc. SPIE 8565, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IX, 856568 (8 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2005647; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2005647
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