1 October 2013 Geometrical and quantum mechanical aspects in observers' mathematics
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Abstract
When we create mathematical models for Quantum Mechanics we assume that the mathematical apparatus used in modeling, at least the simplest mathematical apparatus, is infallible. In particular, this relates to the use of ”infinitely small” and ”infinitely large” quantities in arithmetic and the use of Newton Cauchy definitions of a limit and derivative in analysis. We believe that is where the main problem lies in contemporary study of nature. We have introduced a new concept of Observer’s Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Observer’s Mathematics creates new arithmetic, algebra, geometry, topology, analysis and logic which do not contain the concept of continuum, but locally coincide with the standard fields. We prove that Euclidean Geometry works in sufficiently small neighborhood of the given line, but when we enlarge the neighborhood, non-euclidean Geometry takes over. We prove that the physical speed is a random variable, cannot exceed some constant, and this constant does not depend on an inertial coordinate system. We proved the following theorems: Theorem A (Lagrangian). Let L be a Lagrange function of free material point with mass m and speed v. Then the probability P of L = m 2 v2 is less than 1: P(L = m 2 v2) < 1. Theorem B (Nadezhda effect). On the plane (x, y) on every line y = kx there is a point (x0, y0) with no existing Euclidean distance between origin (0, 0) and this point. Conjecture (Black Hole). Our space-time nature is a black hole: light cannot go out infinitely far from origin.
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Boris Khots, Dmitriy Khots, "Geometrical and quantum mechanical aspects in observers' mathematics", Proc. SPIE 8832, The Nature of Light: What are Photons? V, 88321D (1 October 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2021460; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2021460
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