3 March 2014 Evaluation of state-of-the-art imaging systems for in vivo monitoring of retinal structure in mice: current capabilities and limitations
Author Affiliations +
Proceedings Volume 8930, Ophthalmic Technologies XXIV; 893005 (2014) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2040964
Event: SPIE BiOS, 2014, San Francisco, California, United States
Abstract
Animal models of human diseases play an important role in studying and advancing our understanding of these conditions, allowing molecular level studies of pathogenesis as well as testing of new therapies. Recently several non-invasive imaging modalities including Fundus Camera, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) have been successfully applied to monitor changes in the retinas of the living animals in experiments in which a single animal is followed over a portion of its lifespan. Here we evaluate the capabilities and limitations of these three imaging modalities for visualization of specific structures in the mouse eye. Example images acquired from different types of mice are presented. Future directions of development for these instruments and potential advantages of multi-modal imaging systems are discussed as well.
© (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Pengfei Zhang, Pengfei Zhang, Azhar Zam, Azhar Zam, Edward N. Pugh, Edward N. Pugh, Robert J. Zawadzki, Robert J. Zawadzki, } "Evaluation of state-of-the-art imaging systems for in vivo monitoring of retinal structure in mice: current capabilities and limitations", Proc. SPIE 8930, Ophthalmic Technologies XXIV, 893005 (3 March 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2040964; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2040964
PROCEEDINGS
9 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top