6 March 2014 Development of a novel configuration for a MEMS transducer for low bias and high resolution imaging applications
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Abstract
A robust capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer has been developed. In this novel configuration, a stack of two deflectable membranes are suspended over a fixed bottom electrode. Similar to conventional capacitive ultrasonic transducers, a generated electrostatic force between the electrodes causes the membranes to deflect and vibrate. However, in this new configuration the transducer effective cavity height is reduced due to the deflection of two membranes. Therefore, the transducer spring constant is more susceptible to bias voltage, which in return reduces the required bias voltage. The transducers have been produced employing a MEMS sacrificial technique where two different membrane anchoring (curved- and flat- anchors) structures, with similar membrane radii were fabricated. Highly doped polysilicon was used as the membrane material. The resonant frequencies of the two transducers have been investigated. It was found that the transducers with curved membrane anchors exhibits a larger resonant frequency shift compared to the transducers with flat membranes for a given bias voltage. Comparison has been made between the spring constant of the flat membrane transducer and that of a conventional single membrane transducer. It is shown that the multiple moving membrane transducer exhibits a larger reduction in the spring constant compared to the conventional transducer, when driven with the same bias voltage. This results in a transducer with a higher power generation capability and sensitivity.
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Tahereh Arezoo Emadi, Tahereh Arezoo Emadi, Douglas A. Buchanan, Douglas A. Buchanan, } "Development of a novel configuration for a MEMS transducer for low bias and high resolution imaging applications", Proc. SPIE 8976, Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems XII, 897614 (6 March 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2037840; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2037840
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