Abstract
This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 9112, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction (if any), and Conference Committee listing.

The papers included in this volume were part of the technical conference cited on the cover and title page. Papers were selected and subject to review by the editors and conference program committee. Some conference presentations may not be available for publication. The papers published in these proceedings reflect the work and thoughts of the authors and are published herein as submitted. The publisher is not responsible for the validity of the information or for any outcomes resulting from reliance thereon.

Please use the following format to cite material from this book:

Author(s), “Title of Paper,” in Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring IV, edited by šárka O. Southern, Mark A. Mentzer, Isaac Rodriguez-Chavez, Virginia E. Wotring, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 9112 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 2014) Article CID Number.

ISSN: 0277-786X

ISBN: 9781628410495

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Conference Committee

Symposium Chair

  • David A. Whelan, Boeing Defense, Space, and Security (United States)

Symposium Co-chair

  • Wolfgang Schade, Technische Universität Clausthal (Germany) and Fraunhofer Heinrich-Hertz-Institut (Germany)

Conference Chair

  • Šárka O. Southern, Gaia Medical Institute (United States)

Conference Co-chairs

  • Mark A. Mentzer, Neuroscience Applications Group, LLC (United States)

  • Isaac Rodriguez-Chavez, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (United States)

  • Virginia E. Wotring, Universities Space Research Association/NASA JSC (United States)

Conference Program Committee

  • James Delehanty, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (United States)

  • Theresa G. Evans-Nguyen, Draper Laboratory (United States)

  • Peter Kiesel, Palo Alto Research Center, Inc. (United States)

  • Baochuan Lin, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (United States)

  • Daniel Malamud, New York University (United States)

  • Igor Medintz, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (United States)

  • Richard M. Ozanich, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

  • Ava M. Puccio, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (United States)

  • Steven A. Ripp, The University of Tennessee (United States)

  • Albert Skip Rizzo III, The University of Southern California (United States)

  • Kim E. Sapsford, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (United States)

  • Shadrian B. Strong, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (United States)

  • David E. Wolf, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)

  • Aurel Ymeti, Ostendum R&D BV (Netherlands)

Session Chairs

  • 1 Non-invasive Disease Diagnostics for Global Health I

    Šárka O. Southern, Gaia Medical Institute (United States)

    Isaac R. Rodriguez-Chavez, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (United States)

    Daniel Malamud, New York University (United States)

  • 2 Non-invasive Disease Diagnostics for Global Health II

    Timothy J. Griffin, University of Minnesota (United States)

    Charles F. Streckfus, The University of Texas at Houston (United States)

    Šárka O. Southern, Gaia Medical Institute (United States)

  • 3 Military Medicine I: Traumatic Brain Injury and PTSD

    Mary E. Michel, National Institutes of Health (United States)

    Geoffrey Ling, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (United States)

    Barry D. Jordan, Sports Concussion Institute (United States)

  • 4 Military Medicine II: Physiology and Medicine of Extreme Environments and Spaceflight

    Virginia E. Wotring, Universities Space Research Association/NASA JSC (United States)

    Jonathan D. Stallings, U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research (United States)

  • 5 Sensing Technologies for Disease Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring I

    Stephen M. Hewitt, National Cancer Institute (United States)

    Richard Conroy, National Institutes of Health (United States)

    Šárka O. Southern, Gaia Medical Institute (United States)

  • 6 Sensing Technologies for Disease Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring II

    Stephen M. Hewitt, National Cancer Institute (United States)

    Claudia Gärtner, microfluidic ChipShop GmbH (Germany)

Introduction

The 2014 SPIE Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring conference embraced a wealth of state-of-the-art information in basic and applied science. This event covered the latest developments in the following areas:

  • Non-invasive Disease Diagnostics for Global Health— This opening series of two consecutive sessions focused on oral biospecimen based rapid assays and point-of-care devices for the detection of pathogens causing infectious diseases, biomarkers for cancer, and analytes for non-communicable diseases such as diabetes. They also covered presentations on the human proteasome and microbiome with linkage to human diseases and diagnostic approaches. The sessions were built on the past experience and expertise of the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

  • Military Medicine I: Traumatic Brain Injury and PTSD—This assembly covered oral-biomarker based diagnostics for brain damage and TBI as well as prevention and rehabilitation technologies. Neurorehabilitation and noninvasive neuromodulation were also discussed as critical approaches for effective functioning.

  • Military Medicine II: Physiology and Medicine of Extreme Environments and Spaceflight—This scientific segment showcased physiological, pharmacological and diagnostic sensing methodologies during spaceflight per the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as well as military-relevant toxicans and future sensing trends per the Department of Defense. It also included latest technologies to determine hydration status in warfighters, eye surgery using the latest laser technologies, and sensing tools for blood analysis.

  • Sensing Technologies for Disease Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring—This closing series of two consecutive sessions provided the venues to learn and discuss more results on the next generation of diagnostic tools and field technologies for diseases, including biomarker detection by digital imaging, multiplex technologies, capillary electrophoresis and molecular platforms serving as labs-on-chips.

This conference allowed cross-fertilization of ideas, projects and collaborative work by a multidisciplinary audience of national and international colleagues from the academia, industry and federal government: The National Institutes of Health, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the Department of Defense.

In 2015, this conference will enhance its focus on Global Health as an encompassing umbrella to include sensing technologies at early, medium and advanced level of development and implementation for communicable and non-communicable diseases impacting public and military health.

The success of this conference lied in the compelling talks presented by distinguished speakers and the active and perceptive audience of colleagues who actively participated. The knowledge shared in this conference seeded projects that will translate into tangible and novel sensing tools to improve human health and quality of life. We look forward to enhancing the productivity and the success of this conference in 2015.

Šárka O. Southern

Isaac Rodriguez-Chavez

© (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
} "Front Matter: Volume 9112", Proc. SPIE 9112, Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, and Environmental Monitoring IV, 911201 (18 June 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2074015; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2074015
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