1 May 2014 Comparison of off-axis TMA and FMA telescopes optimized over different fields of view: applications to Earth observation
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
TMA, or three mirror anastigmats, have already been used successfully for various space missions. In the frame of earth observation, ProbaV satellite uses 3 TMAs to cover a total 102.4° field-of-view; ground sampling distance is about 100m at the center of field-of view and 370m at the edge. For future earth observation missions, the goal would be to reach 100m spatial resolution all over the 102.4° FOV. This would require to up-scale optical specifications, thus increasing geometrical aberrations. FMA, or four mirror anastigmats, could thus be a good candidate for future missions, as a fourth mirror would allow better correction of optical aberrations. In this work, TMA and FMA have been optimized over different fields-of view. Performance limitations are then derived, which show that FMA seems promising for future missions. Radiometry aspects are discussed and preliminary tolerance analysis is carried out.
© (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
L. Clermont, Y. Stockman, W. Dierckx, J. Loicq, "Comparison of off-axis TMA and FMA telescopes optimized over different fields of view: applications to Earth observation", Proc. SPIE 9131, Optical Modelling and Design III, 91310N (1 May 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2052271; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2052271
PROCEEDINGS
10 PAGES


SHARE
RELATED CONTENT

From SPOT 5 to Pleiades HR evolution of the...
Proceedings of SPIE (November 21 2017)
SPOT4 HRVIR first in-flight image quality results
Proceedings of SPIE (December 21 1998)
Topsat: the demands placed by image quality
Proceedings of SPIE (September 24 2002)
Final results of the PERSEE experiment
Proceedings of SPIE (September 12 2012)
Design and development of the Cartosat payload for IRS P5...
Proceedings of SPIE (December 22 2006)
PRISM: processes research by imaging space mission
Proceedings of SPIE (October 21 1996)

Back to Top