Abstract
This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 9143, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction, and Conference Committee listing.
Oschmann, Clampin, Fazio, and MacEwen: Front Matter: Volume 9143

The papers included in this volume were part of the technical conference cited on the cover and title page. Papers were selected and subject to review by the editors and conference program committee. Some conference presentations may not be available for publication. The papers published in these proceedings reflect the work and thoughts of the authors and are published herein as submitted. The publisher is not responsible for the validity of the information or for any outcomes resulting from reliance thereon.

Please use the following format to cite material from this book:

Author(s), “Title of Paper,” in Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, edited by Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr., Mark Clampin, Giovanni G. Fazio, Howard A. MacEwen, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 9143 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 2014) Article CID Number.

ISSN: 0277-786X

ISBN: 9780819496119

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Conference Committee

Symposium Chairs

  • Gillian S. Wright, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • Luc Simard, National Research Council Canada (Canada)

Symposium Co-chairs

  • Colin Cunningham, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)

Conference Chairs

  • Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr., Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

  • Mark Clampin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • Giovanni G. Fazio, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (United States)

  • Howard A. MacEwen, Reviresco LLC (United States)

Conference Co-chair

  • Allison A. Barto, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

Conference Program Committee

  • Jonathan W. Arenberg, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (United States)

  • Richard K. Barry, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • Natalie M. Batalha, NASA Ames Space Flight Center (United States)

  • James B. Breckinridge, California Institute of Technology (United States)

  • Richard W. Capps, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (United States)

  • Jennifer A. Dooley, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (United States)

  • René Doyon, Université de Montréal (Canada)

  • Lee D. Feinberg, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • Makenzie Lystrup, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

  • Jean-Pierre Maillard, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (France)

  • Gary W. Matthews, Exelis Inc. (United States)

  • Jaymie Mark Matthews, The University of British Columbia (Canada)

  • Mark J. McCaughrean, European Space Research and Technology Center (Netherlands)

  • Eric P. Smith, NASA Headquarters (United States)

  • Giorgio Savini, University College London (United Kingdom)

  • Giovanna Tinetti, University College London (United Kingdom)

Session Chairs

  • 1 JWST I

    • Eric P. Smith, NASA Headquarters (United States)

  • 2 JWST II

    • Giorgio Savini, University College London (United Kingdom)

  • 3 JWST III

    • Mark Clampin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • 4 Euclid

    • Jonathan W. Arenberg, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (United States)

    • Monday Plenary Session

      • Luc Simard, National Research Council Canada (Canada)

  • 5 AFTA/WFIRST I

    • Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr., Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

  • 6 AFTA/WFIRST II

    • Lee D. Feinberg, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • 7 Astrometry

    • Giovanni G. Fazio, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (United States)

    • Plenary Session

      • Gillian S. Wright, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • 8 Innovative Concepts I

    • Howard A. MacEwen, Reviresco LLC (United States)

  • 9 Innovative Concepts II

    • Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr., Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

    • Wednesday Plenary Session

      • Colin Cunningham, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • 10 SPICA/SPITZER

    • James B. Breckinridge, The University of Arizona (United States)

  • 11 Solar System

    • Allison A. Barto, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

  • 12 Technology -Optics

    • Gary W. Matthews, Exelis Inc. (United States)

    • Thursday Plenary Session

      • Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)

  • 13 Technology Instruments I

    • Jaymie Mark Matthews, The University of British Columbia (Canada)

  • 14 Technology Instruments II

    • Etienne Artigau, Université de Montréal (Canada)

  • 15 Exoplanets I

    • Jean-Pierre Maillard, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (France)

  • 16 Exoplanets II

    • Makenzie Lystrup, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation (United States)

Introduction

In these conference proceedings, we address the current status of major space telescope flight programs, new concepts for systems and instruments under development, and enabling technologies for use in new or enhanced missions.

  • The Proceedings volume begins with a large set of papers covering every aspect of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. Specific emphasis is paid to this year’s program on the execution and planning of JWST’s integration and test program, now well under way and positioning the JWST on the road to launch in 2018.

  • Far-IR programs covered in these Proceedings include Herschel’s scientific performance and a description of the new project framework for the SPICA mission. The instrument designs under this new framework for SPICA are summarized together with their scientific drivers. Finally, a new specialized technique developed to exploit the Spitzer Space Telescope warm mission will help improve astrometry with Spitzer, while additional papers address the analysis of existing Spitzer data.

  • Europe’s flagship Dark Energy mission, Euclid, has been approved for implementation and is moving forward. The mission is well represented by descriptions of the program status and science requirements, complemented by detailed descriptions of the design and performance of the observatory and the baselined science instruments.

  • Sessions on innovative concepts presented several new ideas for future very large-aperture optical/IR space telescopes designed to undertake a range of astrophysics missions, with a primary goal of characterizing terrestrial planets around nearby stars. Much of these sessions focused on high contrast imaging and the fabrication of large aperture, low-cost space telescope optics.

The conference theme was the “behind-the-scene processes” that have led or are leading projects from the drawing board to the sky. The diversity of papers presented in the conference demonstrate the wide range and difficulty of challenges encountered at every stage of the process, and the innovative approaches that must be employed to overcome those challenges and realize the opportunities that they also present.

Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr.

Mark Clampin

Giovanni G. Fazio

Howard A. MacEwen

© (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
} "Front Matter: Volume 9143", Proc. SPIE 9143, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 914301 (3 September 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2075730; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2075730
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