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28 August 2014 Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE): science rationale, optical design, and telescope architecture
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Abstract
One of the key goals of NASA’s astrophysics program is to answer the question: How did galaxies evolve into the spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies that we see today? We describe a space mission concept called Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) to help address this question by making a large ultraviolet spectroscopic survey of galaxies at a redshift, z~1 (look-back time of ~8 billion years). GESE is a 1.5-m space telescope with an near-ultraviolet (NUV) multi-object slit spectrograph covering the spectral range, 0.2-0.4 μm (0.1-0.2 μm as emitted by galaxies at a redshift, z~1) at a spectral resolution of Δλ=6 Å.
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Sara R. Heap, Qian Gong, Tony Hull, and Lloyd Purves "Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE): science rationale, optical design, and telescope architecture", Proc. SPIE 9143, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2014: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 91433K (28 August 2014); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2056768
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