Abstract
This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 9150, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction, and the Conference Committee listing.

The papers included in this volume were part of the technical conference cited on the cover and title page. Papers were selected and subject to review by the editors and conference program committee. Some conference presentations may not be available for publication. The papers published in these proceedings reflect the work and thoughts of the authors and are published herein as submitted. The publisher is not responsible for the validity of the information or for any outcomes resulting from reliance thereon.

Please use the following format to cite material from this book:

Author(s), "Title of Paper," in Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy VI, edited by George Z. Angeli, Philippe Dierickx, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 9150 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 2014) Article CID Number.

ISSN: 0277-786X

ISBN: 9780819496188

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Copyright © 2014, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

Copying of material in this book for internal or personal use, or for the internal or personal use of specific clients, beyond the fair use provisions granted by the U.S. Copyright Law is authorized by SPIE subject to payment of copying fees. The Transactional Reporting Service base fee for this volume is $18.00 per article (or portion thereof), which should be paid directly to the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923. Payment may also be made electronically through CCC Online at copyright.com. Other copying for republication, resale, advertising or promotion, or any form of systematic or multiple reproduction of any material in this book is prohibited except with permission in writing from the publisher. The CCC fee code is 0277-786X/14/$18.00.

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Publication of record for individual papers is online in the SPIE Digital Library.

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Paper Numbering: Proceedings of SPIE follow an e-First publication model, with papers published first online and then in print and on CD-ROM. Papers are published as they are submitted and meet publication criteria. A unique, consistent, permanent citation identifier (CID) number is assigned to each article at the time of the first publication. Utilization of CIDs allows articles to be fully citable as soon as they are published online, and connects the same identifier to all online, print, and electronic versions of the publication. SPIE uses a six-digit CID article numbering system in which:

  • The first four digits correspond to the SPIE volume number.

  • The last two digits indicate publication order within the volume using a Base 36 numbering system employing both numerals and letters. These two-number sets start with 00, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 0A, 0B … 0Z, followed by 10-1Z, 20-2Z, etc.

The CID Number appears on each page of the manuscript. The complete citation is used on the first page, and an abbreviated version on subsequent pages. Numbers in the index correspond to the last two digits of the six-digit CID Number.

Conference Committee

Symposium Chairs

  • Gillian S. Wright, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • Luc Simard, National Research Council Canada (Canada)

Symposium Co-chairs

  • Colin Cunningham, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • Masanori Iye, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)

Conference Chairs

  • George Z. Angeli, LSST Corporation (United States)

  • Philippe Dierickx, European Southern Observatory (Germany)

Conference Program Committee

  • Simon C. Craig, National Solar Observatory (United States)

  • Sebastian G. Els, European Space Astronomy Centre (Spain)

  • Gary E. Mosier, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

  • Scott Roberts, Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory Corporation (Canada)

  • Hermine Schnetler, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • Michael Sheehan, Giant Magellan Telescope Project (United States)

  • Mitchell Troy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (United States)

Session Chairs

  • 1 Project Management I

    George Z. Angeli, LSST Corporation (United States)

  • 2 Project Management II

    Sebastian G. Els, European Space Astronomy Centre (Spain)

  • 3 System Integration, Verification, and Validation

    Scott Roberts, Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory Corporation (United States)

  • 4 System Designs and Architectures

    Hermine Schnetler, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • 5 Model Based Systems Engineering

    Sebastian G. Els, European Space Astronomy Centre (Spain)

  • 6 System Modeling I

    George Z. Angeli, LSST Corporation (United States)

  • 7 Systems Engineering I

    Simon Craig, National Solar Observatory (United States)

    Tuesday Plenary Session

    Gillian S. Wright, UK Astronomy Technology Centre (United Kingdom)

  • 8 Systems Engineering II

    Michael Sheehan, Giant Magellan Telescope Project (United States)

  • 9 System Modeling II

    Mitchell Troy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (United States)

  • 10 Systems Engineering III

    Philippe Dierickx, European Southern Observatory (Germany)

Introduction

This conference marked the 10th anniversary of launching a gathering dedicated to Systems Modeling and Systems Engineering as they are applied on telescope and instrument developments in astronomy.

Until the end of the 20th century, telescopes and instruments were difficult to make, but conceptually simple systems. New technologies, new processes, new materials were needed to make them possible, and some of these undertakings would still be considered as mighty challenges today. However, these telescopes and instruments belonged to the machine world. In this world, it is the parts that matter most; understanding them is broadly sufficient to understand the system, and make it work. This seems no longer true. Instruments, and after them, the notionally simpler telescopes, became functionally more complex. They have been transiting into the systems world, whereby overall system properties can no longer be approximated by the sum of individual ones. In this world, engineers must cope with difficulty and complexity. The former is usually the domain of the specialist; the latter, of the systems engineer.

The evolution of this conference over the last decade reflects this transition. In Glasgow, the conference was dominated by modeling, indicating the prevalence of technical challenges on the minds of our colleagues. In the relatively short timeframe of 10 years, the tide has changed; not just the large number of systems engineering papers are demonstrating it, but also their high quality.

In 2004, the goal was set for the community, as well as for the conference: “Systems engineering has existed in space astronomy projects since the very first mission. With the ever increasing complexity and cost of ground-based facilities, it should also be at the core of all astronomy technology projects.” If this year’s conference is any indication, we are getting there …

Projects have started picking from a vast body of knowledge, adopting and adapting principles and methods to their particular needs, objectives, or culture. Through these proceedings, we hope the reader may find ideas about and solutions to problems he or she has to cope with, and, perhaps, eventually decide to share with the community his or her experience at the next occurrence of this conference. Keep the body of knowledge breathing!

George Z. Angeli

Philippe Dierickx

© (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
} "Front Matter: Volume 9150", Proc. SPIE 9150, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy VI, 915001 (20 August 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2075747; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2075747
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