23 July 2014 Hacking for astronomy: can 3D printers and open-hardware enable low-cost sub-/millimeter instrumentation?
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Abstract
There have been several exciting developments in the technologies commonly used n in the hardware hacking community. Advances in low cost additive-manufacturing processes (i.e. 3D-printers) and the development of openhardware projects, which have produced inexpensive and easily programmable micro-controllers and micro-computers (i.e. Arduino and Raspberry Pi) have opened a new door for individuals seeking to make their own devices. Here we describe the potential for these technologies to reduce costs in construction and development of submillimeter/millimeter astronomical instrumentation. Specifically we have begun a program to measure the optical properties of the custom plastics used in 3D-printers as well as the printer accuracy and resolution to assess the feasibility of directly printing sub- /millimeter transmissive optics. We will also discuss low cost designs for cryogenic temperature measurement and control utilizing Arduino and Raspberry Pi.
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Carl Ferkinhoff, "Hacking for astronomy: can 3D printers and open-hardware enable low-cost sub-/millimeter instrumentation?", Proc. SPIE 9153, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII, 915329 (23 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2056627; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2056627
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