23 July 2014 Design, fabrication, and testing of lumped element kinetic inductance detectors for 3 mm CMB Observations
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Abstract
Kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) are a promising technology for low-noise, highly-multiplexible mm- and submm-wave detection. KIDs have a number of advantages over other detector technologies, which make them an appealing option in the cosmic microwave background B-mode anisotropy search, including passive frequency domain multiplexing and relatively simple fabrication, but have suffered from challenges associated with noise control. Here we describe design and fabrication of a 20-pixel prototype array of lumped element molybdenum KIDs. We show Q, frequency and temperature measurements from the array under dark conditions. We also present evidence for a double superconducting gap in molybdenum.
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Amy E. Lowitz, Ari-David Brown, Thomas R. Stevenson, Peter T. Timbie, Edward J. Wollack, "Design, fabrication, and testing of lumped element kinetic inductance detectors for 3 mm CMB Observations", Proc. SPIE 9153, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy VII, 91532R (23 July 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2057102; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2057102
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