7 October 2014 OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) mission operations planning and initial operations experiences
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Abstract
OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) is the first NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) mission dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide, specifically to identify sources (emitters) and sinks (absorbers) on a regional (1000 km x 1000 km) scale. The mission is designed to meet a science imperative by providing critical and urgent measurements needed to improve understanding of the carbon cycle and global climate change processes. The single instrument consisting of three grating spectrometers was built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, but is based on the design co-developed with Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation for the original OCO mission. The instrument underwent an extensive ground test program. This was generally made possible through the use of a thermal vacuum chamber with a window/port that allowed optical ground support equipment to stimulate the instrument. The instrument was later delivered to Orbital Sciences Corporation for integration and test with the LEOStar-2 spacecraft. During the overall ground test campaign, proper function and performance in simulated launch, ascent, and space environments were verified. The observatory was launched into space on 02 July 2014. Initial indications are that the instrument is meeting functional and performance specifications, and there is every expectation that the spatially-order, geo-located, calibrated spectra of reflected sunlight and the science retrievals will meet the Level 1 science requirements.
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Ralph R. Basilio, Ralph R. Basilio, H. Randy Pollock, H. Randy Pollock, Sarah L. Hunyadi-Lay, Sarah L. Hunyadi-Lay, } "OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) mission operations planning and initial operations experiences", Proc. SPIE 9241, Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites XVIII, 924105 (7 October 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2074164; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2074164
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