28 January 2015 A note on the stability and discriminability of graph-based features for classification problems in digital pathology
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Proceedings Volume 9287, 10th International Symposium on Medical Information Processing and Analysis; 928703 (2015) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2085141
Event: Tenth International Symposium on Medical Information Processing and Analysis, 2014, Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
Abstract
Nuclear architecture or the spatial arrangement of individual cancer nuclei on histopathology images has been shown to be associated with different grades and differential risk for a number of solid tumors such as breast, prostate, and oropharyngeal. Graph-based representations of individual nuclei (nuclei representing the graph nodes) allows for mining of quantitative metrics to describe tumor morphology. These graph features can be broadly categorized into global and local depending on the type of graph construction method. While a number of local graph (e.g. Cell Cluster Graphs) and global graph (e.g. Voronoi, Delaunay Triangulation, Minimum Spanning Tree) features have been shown to associated with cancer grade, risk, and outcome for different cancer types, the sensitivity of the preceding segmentation algorithms in identifying individual nuclei can have a significant bearing on the discriminability of the resultant features. This therefore begs the question as to which features while being discriminative of cancer grade and aggressiveness are also the most resilient to the segmentation errors. These properties are particularly desirable in the context of digital pathology images, where the method of slide preparation, staining, and type of nuclear segmentation algorithm employed can all dramatically affect the quality of the nuclear graphs and corresponding features. In this paper we evaluated the trade off between discriminability and stability of both global and local graph-based features in conjunction with a few different segmentation algorithms and in the context of two different histopathology image datasets of breast cancer from whole-slide images (WSI) and tissue microarrays (TMA). Specifically in this paper we investigate a few different performance measures including stability, discriminability and stability vs discriminability trade off, all of which are based on p-values from the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance for local and global graph features. Apart from identifying the set of local and global features that satisfied the trade off between stability and discriminability, our most interesting finding was that a simple segmentation method was sufficient to identify the most discriminant features for invasive tumour detection in TMAs, whereas for tumour grading in WSI, the graph based features were more sensitive to the accuracy of the segmentation algorithm employed.
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Angel Cruz-Roa, Angel Cruz-Roa, Jun Xu, Jun Xu, Anant Madabhushi, Anant Madabhushi, } "A note on the stability and discriminability of graph-based features for classification problems in digital pathology", Proc. SPIE 9287, 10th International Symposium on Medical Information Processing and Analysis, 928703 (28 January 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2085141; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2085141
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