8 February 2015 Turning assistive machines into assistive robots
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Abstract
For decades, the potential for automation in particular, in the form of smart wheelchairs to aid those with motor, or cognitive, impairments has been recognized. It is a paradox that often the more severe a person's motor impairment, the more challenging it is for them to operate the very assistive machines which might enhance their quality of life. A primary aim of my lab is to address this confound by incorporating robotics autonomy and intelligence into assistive machines turning the machine into a kind of robot, and offloading some of the control burden from the user. Robots already synthetically sense, act in and reason about the world, and these technologies can be leveraged to help bridge the gap left by sensory, motor or cognitive impairments in the users of assistive machines. This paper overviews some of the ongoing projects in my lab, which strives to advance human ability through robotics autonomy.
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Brenna D. Argall, "Turning assistive machines into assistive robots", Proc. SPIE 9370, Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices XII, 93701Y (8 February 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2085352; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2085352
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