6 May 2015 Transparency-switching optical element for sun tracking applications
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
We present a novel optical element that behaves as a dynamic aperture capable of tracking a moving light source. The element is based on a composite material which when heated undergoes reversible transition from an opaque to transparent state, resulting from a phase transition in one of its components that modifies the microstructure of the material. The material has been designed to undergo a localized transparency transition at the point of illumination by a focused beam, activated by the absorption and conversion to heat of a portion of the incident light. As a result of this mechanism the aperture reactively tracks a moving light spot, such as that created by focusing sunlight onto a surface during the sun’s apparent motion through the sky. Such an element has been proposed as a solution to the sun tracking problem of solar concentration, as it allows admission of sunlight into a concentrating light trap over a wide range of solar angles.
© (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Harry Apostoleris, Harry Apostoleris, Samuele Lilliu, Samuele Lilliu, Matteo Chiesa, Matteo Chiesa, Marco Stefancich, Marco Stefancich, } "Transparency-switching optical element for sun tracking applications", Proc. SPIE 9516, Integrated Optics: Physics and Simulations II, 951618 (6 May 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2179947; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2179947
PROCEEDINGS
3 PAGES


SHARE
RELATED CONTENT

See-through multi-view 3D display with parallax barrier
Proceedings of SPIE (March 06 2016)
Reactive granular optics for passive tracking of the sun
Proceedings of SPIE (August 24 2017)
Wide angle digital slit sun sensor using CCD linear array
Proceedings of SPIE (November 20 2017)
Comparative performance assessment of switching options
Proceedings of SPIE (November 15 2004)
OICETS optical link communications experiment in space
Proceedings of SPIE (September 23 1996)

Back to Top