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21 August 2015 Using Raman spectroscopy and SERS for in situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria
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Abstract
Bacteria colonize plant roots to form a symbiotic relationship with the plant and can play in important role in promoting plant growth. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to study these bacterial systems and the chemical signals they utilize to interact with the plant. We present a Raman study of Pantoea YR343 that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides (Eastern Cottonwood). Pantoea sp. YR343 produce yellowish carotenoid pigment that play a role in protection against UV radiation, in the anti-oxidative pathways and in membrane fluidity. Raman spectroscopy is used to non-invasively characterize the membrane bound carotenoids. The spectra collected from a mutant strain created by knocking out the crtB gene that encodes a phytoene synthase responsible for early stage of carotenoid biosynthesis, lack the carotenoid peaks. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is being employed to detect the plant phytoharmone indoleacetic acid that is synthesized by the bacteria. This work describes our recent progress towards utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a label free, non-destructive method of studying plant-bacteria interactions in the rhizosphere.
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Sneha Polisetti, Nameera Baig, Amber Bible, Jennifer Morrell-Falvey, Mitchel Doktycz, and Paul W. Bohn "Using Raman spectroscopy and SERS for in situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria", Proc. SPIE 9550, Biosensing and Nanomedicine VIII, 95500D (21 August 2015); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2188647
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