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11 September 2015 Does restorer need a scanner? Optical methods in canvas painting diagnostic
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Proceedings Volume 9662, Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments 2015; 96622D (2015) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2205921
Event: XXXVI Symposium on Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments (Wilga 2015), 2015, Wilga, Poland
Abstract
The principal rule of the conservation process is an individual approach to every piece of art. Easel paintings are varying regarding their forms (shape), technique and technology and behave differently in various conditions. In order to carry out initial researches of the particular object several noninvasive analyzes are performed. However, none of these methods give information about geometric shape of the object and metric analysis of its surface. This gap in the field of initial optical analysis, may be filled with optical 3D scanning. From conservators' point of view, we may say that a laser scanner slowly becomes an indispensable and daily work tool in the diagnosis and conservation methodology of the canvas paintings.
© (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Katarzyna Górecka and Aleksandra Rzeszutek "Does restorer need a scanner? Optical methods in canvas painting diagnostic", Proc. SPIE 9662, Photonics Applications in Astronomy, Communications, Industry, and High-Energy Physics Experiments 2015, 96622D (11 September 2015); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2205921
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