8 October 2015 Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves
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Proceedings Volume 9677, AOPC 2015: Optical Test, Measurement, and Equipment; 967727 (2015) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2202738
Event: Applied Optics and Photonics China (AOPC2015), 2015, Beijing, China
Abstract
The existence of Gravitational Wave (GW) is one of the greatest predictions of Einstein’s relative theory. It has played an important part in the radiation theory, black hole theory, space explore and so on. The GW detection has been an important aspect of modern physics. With the research proceeding further, there are still a lot of challenges existing in the interferometer which is the key instrument in GW detection especially the measurement of the super large radius optics. To solve this problem, one solution , Fizeau interference, for measuring the super large radius has been presented. We change the tradition that curved surface must be measured with a standard curved surface. We use a flat mirror as a reference flat and it can lower both the cost and the test requirement a lot. We select a concave mirror with the radius of 1600mm as a sample. After the precision measurement and analysis, the experimental results show that the relative error of radius is better than 3%, and it can fully meet the requirements of the measurement of super large radius optics. When calculating each pixel with standard cylinder, the edges are not sharp because of diffraction or some other reasons, we detect the edge and calculate the diameter of the cylinder automatically, and it can improve the precision a lot. In general, this method is simple, fast, non-traumatic, and highly precision, it can also provide us a new though in the measurement of super large radius optics.
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Cheng Yang, Sen Han, Quanying Wu, Binming Liang, Changlun Hou, "Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves", Proc. SPIE 9677, AOPC 2015: Optical Test, Measurement, and Equipment, 967727 (8 October 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2202738; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2202738
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