26 July 2016 Intensity interferometry: optical imaging with kilometer baselines
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Abstract
Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.
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Dainis Dravins, "Intensity interferometry: optical imaging with kilometer baselines", Proc. SPIE 9907, Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V, 99070M (26 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2234130; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2234130
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