9 August 2016 The prototype cameras for trans-Neptunian automatic occultation survey
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Abstract
The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) is a three robotic telescope project to detect the stellar occultation events generated by TransNeptunian Objects (TNOs). TAOS II project aims to monitor about 10000 stars simultaneously at 20Hz to enable statistically significant event rate. The TAOS II camera is designed to cover the 1.7 degrees diameter field of view of the 1.3m telescope with 10 mosaic 4.5k×2k CMOS sensors. The new CMOS sensor (CIS 113) has a back illumination thinned structure and high sensitivity to provide similar performance to that of the back-illumination thinned CCDs. Due to the requirements of high performance and high speed, the development of the new CMOS sensor is still in progress. Before the science arrays are delivered, a prototype camera is developed to help on the commissioning of the robotic telescope system. The prototype camera uses the small format e2v CIS 107 device but with the same dewar and also the similar control electronics as the TAOS II science camera. The sensors, mounted on a single Invar plate, are cooled to the operation temperature of about 200K as the science array by a cryogenic cooler. The Invar plate is connected to the dewar body through a supporting ring with three G10 bipods. The control electronics consists of analog part and a Xilinx FPGA based digital circuit. One FPGA is needed to control and process the signal from a CMOS sensor for 20Hz region of interests (ROI) readout.
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Shiang-Yu Wang, Hung-Hsu Ling, Yen-Sang Hu, John C. Geary, Yin-Chang Chang, Hsin-Yo Chen, Stephen M. Amato, Pin-Jie Huang, Jerome Pratlong, Andrew Szentgyorgyi, Matthew Lehner, Timothy Norton, Paul Jorden, "The prototype cameras for trans-Neptunian automatic occultation survey", Proc. SPIE 9908, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, 990846 (9 August 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2232062; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2232062
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