17 August 2016 Using frequency response functions to manage image degradation from equipment vibration in the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope
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Abstract
The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, providing a significant increase in the resolution of solar data available to the scientific community.

Vibration mitigation is critical in long focal-length telescopes such as the Inouye Solar Telescope, especially when adaptive optics are employed to correct for atmospheric seeing. For this reason, a vibration error budget has been implemented.

Initially, the FRFs for the various mounting points of ancillary equipment were estimated using the finite element analysis (FEA) of the telescope structures. FEA analysis is well documented and understood; the focus of this paper is on the methods involved in estimating a set of experimental (measured) transfer functions of the as-built telescope structure for the purpose of vibration management.

Techniques to measure low-frequency single-input-single-output (SISO) frequency response functions (FRF) between vibration source locations and image motion on the focal plane are described. The measurement equipment includes an instrumented inertial-mass shaker capable of operation down to 4 Hz along with seismic accelerometers. The measurement of vibration at frequencies below 10 Hz with good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires several noise reduction techniques including high-performance windows, noise-averaging, tracking filters, and spectral estimation. These signal-processing techniques are described in detail.
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William R. McBride, William R. McBride, Daniel R. McBride, Daniel R. McBride, "Using frequency response functions to manage image degradation from equipment vibration in the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope", Proc. SPIE 9911, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy VI, 991110 (17 August 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2234316; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2234316
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