26 July 2016 Exploratory visualization of astronomical data on ultra-high-resolution wall displays
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Abstract
Ultra-high-resolution wall displays feature a very high pixel density over a large physical surface, which makes them well-suited to the collaborative, exploratory visualization of large datasets. We introduce FITS-OW, an application designed for such wall displays, that enables astronomers to navigate in large collections of FITS images, query astronomical databases, and display detailed, complementary data and documents about multiple sources simultaneously. We describe how astronomers interact with their data using both the wall’s touchsensitive surface and handheld devices. We also report on the technical challenges we addressed in terms of distributed graphics rendering and data sharing over the computer clusters that drive wall displays.
© (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Emmanuel Pietriga, Emmanuel Pietriga, Fernando del Campo, Fernando del Campo, Amanda Ibsen, Amanda Ibsen, Romain Primet, Romain Primet, Caroline Appert, Caroline Appert, Olivier Chapuis, Olivier Chapuis, Maren Hempel, Maren Hempel, Roberto Muñoz, Roberto Muñoz, Susana Eyheramendy, Susana Eyheramendy, Andres Jordan, Andres Jordan, Hervé Dole, Hervé Dole, } "Exploratory visualization of astronomical data on ultra-high-resolution wall displays", Proc. SPIE 9913, Software and Cyberinfrastructure for Astronomy IV, 99130W (26 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2231191; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2231191
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