27 September 2016 Low-cost scalable quartz crystal microbalance array for environmental sensing
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Proceedings Volume 9944, Organic Sensors and Bioelectronics IX; 99440Y (2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2237942
Event: SPIE Organic Photonics + Electronics, 2016, San Diego, California, United States
Abstract
Proliferation of environmental sensors for internet of things (IoT) applications has increased the need for low-cost platforms capable of accommodating multiple sensors. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) crystals coated with nanometer-thin sensor films are suitable for use in high-resolution (~1 ng) selective gas sensor applications. We demonstrate a scalable array for measuring frequency response of six QCM sensors controlled by low-cost Arduino microcontrollers and a USB multiplexer. Gas pulses and data acquisition were controlled by a LabVIEW user interface. We test the sensor array by measuring the frequency shift of crystals coated with different compositions of polymer composites based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) while films are exposed to water vapor and oxygen inside a controlled environmental chamber. Our sensor array exhibits comparable performance to that of a commercial QCM system, while enabling high-throughput 6 QCM testing for under $1,000. We use deep neural network structures to process sensor response and demonstrate that the QCM array is suitable for gas sensing, environmental monitoring, and electronic-nose applications.
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Eric S. Muckley, Cristain Anazagasty, Christopher B. Jacobs, Tibor Hianik, Ilia N. Ivanov, "Low-cost scalable quartz crystal microbalance array for environmental sensing", Proc. SPIE 9944, Organic Sensors and Bioelectronics IX, 99440Y (27 September 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2237942; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2237942
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KEYWORDS
Crystals

Sensors

Oxygen

Crystallography

Digital filtering

Environmental sensing

Quartz

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