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This section contains the bibliography, index, and author's bio.

Bibliography

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gr18-1.jpg Yakov G. Soskind is Principal Systems Engineer for DHPC Technologies, Inc., in Woodbridge, NJ. He provides innovative solutions and technical expertise to customers in the areas of laser optics, electro-optical sensors, photonics instrumentation, and system-level integration.

Dr. Soskind is a recognized expert in the fields of optical design, diffractive optics, laser systems, and illumination. For more than 30 years, he has contributed to the fields of electro-optical and photonics engineering, successfully reducing to practice numerous innovative solutions in the form of fiber optics and photonics devices, diffractive structures, laser optics, imaging, and illumination devices. His innovative work in the field of diffractive optics has led to the development of novel types of diffractive structures that have enhanced diffraction efficiency and are covered in several issued patents.

Dr. Soskind has been awarded more than 20 domestic and international patents and has authored and co-authored several publications and conference presentations. He also serves on the technical committees of two international conferences.

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