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Abstract
From the time of Senefelder to the present, lithography has undergone tremendous evolution, but overall, its basic principle remains intact. It remains a planographic printing process in which the image and nonimage areas are on the same plane of the printing substrate. Just as in Senefelder’s time, today, the contrast between the image and nonimage areas depends on the interfacial tension of oily inks and water-retaining surfaces. This is in fact the very same principle that governs the immiscibility of oil and water— hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions between the image and nonimage areas. The inks (or resist) are naturally hydrophobic and can be made resistant to the action of etchants when dry.
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CHAPTER 5
52 PAGES


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