1 September 2006 Noise contribution to the correlation between temperature-induced localized reflectance of diabetic skin and blood glucose
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Abstract
We used the effect of temperature on the localized reflectance of human skin to assess the role of noise sources on the correlation between temperature-induced fractional change in optical density of human skin (ODT) and blood glucose concentration [BG]. Two temperature-controlled optical probes at 30°C contacted the skin, one was then cooled by –10°C; the other was heated by +10°C. ODT upon cooling or heating was correlated with capillary [BG] of diabetic volunteers over a period of three days. Calibration models in the first two days were used to predict [BG] in the third day. We examined the conditions where the correlation coefficient (R2) for predicting [BG] in a third day ranked higher than R2 values resulting from fitting permutations of randomized [BG] to the same ODT values. It was possible to establish a four-term linear regression correlation between ODT upon cooling and [BG] with a correlation coefficient higher than that of an established noise threshold in diabetic patients that were mostly females with less than 20 years of diabetes duration. The ability to predict [BG] values with a correlation coefficient above biological and body-interface noise varied between the cases of cooling and heating.
Michael G. Lowery, Brenda Calfin, Shu-Jen Yeh, Tao Doan, Eric B. Shain, Charles F. Hanna, Ronald Hohs, Stanislaw Kantor, John Lindberg, Omar S. Khalil, "Noise contribution to the correlation between temperature-induced localized reflectance of diabetic skin and blood glucose," Journal of Biomedical Optics 11(5), 054029 (1 September 2006). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.2360529
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