1 July 2008 Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine
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J. of Biomedical Optics, 13(4), 041303 (2008). doi:10.1117/1.2953185
Abstract
We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine.
Eva Marie Sevick-Muraca, John C. Rasmussen, "Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine," Journal of Biomedical Optics 13(4), 041303 (1 July 2008). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2953185
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KEYWORDS
Luminescence

Molecular imaging

Tissue optics

Near infrared

Signal detection

Tomography

Modulation

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