1 September 2008 Differentiation of apoptosis from necrosis by dynamic changes of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime in live cells
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J. of Biomedical Optics, 13(5), 054011 (2008). doi:10.1117/1.2975831
Abstract
Direct monitoring of cell death (i.e., apoptosis and necrosis) during or shortly after treatment is desirable in all cancer therapies to determine the outcome. Further differentiation of apoptosis from necrosis is crucial to optimize apoptosis-favored treatment protocols. We investigated the potential modality of using tissue intrinsic fluorescence chromophore, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), for cell death detection. We imaged the fluorescence lifetime changes of NADH before and after staurosporine (STS)-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced necrosis, respectively, using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging in live HeLa cells and 143B osteosarcoma. Time-lapsed lifetime images were acquired at the same site of cells. In untreated cells, the average lifetime of NADH fluorescence was ~1.3 ns. The NADH average fluorescence lifetime increased to ~3.5 ns within 15 min after 1 μM STS treatment and gradually decreased thereafter. The NADH fluorescence intensity increased within 15 min. In contrast, no significant dynamic lifetime change was found in cells treated with 1 mM H2O2. Our findings suggest that monitoring the NADH fluorescence lifetime may be a valuable noninvasive tool to detect apoptosis and distinguish apoptosis from necrosis for the optimization of apoptosis-favored treatment protocols and other clinical applications.
Hsing-Wen Wang, Vladimir Ghukasyan, Chien-Tsun Chen, Yau-Huei Wei, Han-Wen Guo, Jia-Sin Yu, Fu-Jen Kao, "Differentiation of apoptosis from necrosis by dynamic changes of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence lifetime in live cells," Journal of Biomedical Optics 13(5), 054011 (1 September 2008). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2975831
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KEYWORDS
Cell death

Luminescence

Picosecond phenomena

Control systems

Fluorescence lifetime imaging

Photon counting

Acquisition tracking and pointing

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