1 March 2010 Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe for genetic markers on single-stranded DNA
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Abstract
Methods capable of quickly and inexpensively collecting genetic information are of increasing importance. We report a method of using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe single-stranded DNA for genetic markers. This unique approach is used to analyze unmodified genes of moderate length for genetic markers by hybridizing native test oligonucleotides into a surface-enhanced Raman complex, vastly increasing detection sensitivity as compared to traditional Raman spectroscopy. The Raman complex is formed by sandwiching the test DNA between 40-nm gold nanoparticles and a photolithographically defined gold surface. With this design, we are able to collect characteristic Raman spectra about the test DNA and to detect genetic markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and polymorphic regions. Results show that strands containing one of three different types of polymorphism can be differentiated using statistically significant trends regarding Raman intensity.
© (2010) Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Benjamin Moody, Benjamin Moody, John Leotaud, John Leotaud, Gregory S. McCarty, Gregory S. McCarty, } "Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to probe for genetic markers on single-stranded DNA," Journal of Biomedical Optics 15(2), 027014 (1 March 2010). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3400702 . Submission:
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