7 May 2014 Extratympanic observation of middle ear structure using a refractive index matching material (glycerol) and an infrared camera
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Abstract
High-resolution computed tomography has been used mainly in the diagnosis of middle ear disease, such as high-jugular bulb, congenital cholesteatoma, and ossicular disruption. However, certain diagnoses are confirmed through exploratory tympanotomy. There are few noninvasive methods available to observe the middle ear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of glycerol as a refractive index matching material and an infrared (IR) camera system for extratympanic observation. 30% glycerol was used as a refractive index matching material in five fresh cadavers. Each material was divided into four subgroups; GN (glycerol no) group, GO (glycerol out) group, GI (glycerol in) group, and GB (glycerol both) group. A printed letter and middle ear structures on the inside tympanic membrane were observed using a visible and IR ray camera system. In the GB group, there were marked a transilluminated letter or an ossicle on the inside tympanic membrane. In particular, a footplate of stapes was even transilluminated using the IR camera system in the GB group. This method can be useful in the diagnosis of diseases of the middle ear if it is clinically applied through further studies.
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Soo-Keun Kong, Kyong-Myong Chon, Eui-Kyung Goh, Il-Woo Lee, Soo-Geun Wang, "Extratympanic observation of middle ear structure using a refractive index matching material (glycerol) and an infrared camera," Journal of Biomedical Optics 19(5), 055003 (7 May 2014). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.5.055003 . Submission:
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