9 March 2015 Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Cilia-driven fluid flow is a critical yet poorly understood aspect of pulmonary physiology. Here, we demonstrate that optical coherence tomography-based particle tracking velocimetry can be used to quantify subtle variability in cilia-driven flow performance in Xenopus, an important animal model of ciliary biology. Changes in flow performance were quantified in the setting of normal development, as well as in response to three types of perturbations: mechanical (increased fluid viscosity), pharmacological (disrupted serotonin signaling), and genetic (diminished ciliary motor protein expression). Of note, we demonstrate decreased flow secondary to gene knockdown of kif3a a protein involved in ciliogenesis, as well as a dose-response decrease in flow secondary to knockdown of dnah9, an important ciliary motor protein.
© The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.
Brendan K. Huang, Brendan K. Huang, Ute A. Gamm, Ute A. Gamm, Stephan Jonas, Stephan Jonas, Mustafa K. Khokha, Mustafa K. Khokha, Michael A. Choma, Michael A. Choma, } "Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology," Journal of Biomedical Optics 20(3), 030502 (9 March 2015). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.3.030502 . Submission:
JOURNAL ARTICLE
3 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top