16 February 2016 Photoacoustic microscopy of arteriovenous shunts and blood diffusion in early-stage tumors
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Angiogenesis in a tumor region creates arteriovenous (AV) shunts that cause an abnormal venous blood oxygen saturation (sO2) distribution. Here, we applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy to study the AV shunting in vivo. First, we built a phantom to image sO2 distribution in a vessel containing converged flows from two upstream blood vessels with different sO2 values. The phantom experiment showed that the blood from the two upstream vessels maintained a clear sO2 boundary for hundreds of seconds, which is consistent with our theoretical analysis using a diffusion model. Next, we xenotransplanted O-786 tumor cells in mouse ears and observed abnormal sO2 distribution in the downstream vein from the AV shunts in vivo. Finally, we identified the tumor location by tracing the sO2 distribution. Our study suggests that abnormal sO2 distribution induced by the AV shunts in the vessel network may be used as a new functional benchmark for early tumor detection.
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Chenghung Yeh, Jinyang Liang, Yong Zhou, Song Hu, Rebecca E. Sohn, Jeffrey M. Arbeit, Lihong V. Wang, "Photoacoustic microscopy of arteriovenous shunts and blood diffusion in early-stage tumors," Journal of Biomedical Optics 21(2), 020501 (16 February 2016). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.2.020501 . Submission:
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top