14 June 2016 Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography
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Abstract
Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ∼90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ∼300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ∼750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy.
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Layla Pires, Valentin Demidov, I. Alex Vitkin, Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato, Cristina Kurachi, Brian C. Wilson, "Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography," Journal of Biomedical Optics 21(8), 081210 (14 June 2016). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.8.081210 . Submission:
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