1 October 1998 Unresolved Instrumentation Problems Following Clinical Trials Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy
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J. of Biomedical Optics, 3(4), (1998). doi:10.1117/1.429847
Abstract
Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) clinical trials conducted over a seven year period have identified instrument engineering problems related to fiber optic failure, electromagnetic interference, chromophore algorithms, and computational software. These problems have caused confusion amongst clinicians at the bedside, rejection of large volumes of data, repeated reanalysis of data, and a significant diversion of project resources away from clinical studies and into engineering solutions. This article summarizes previously published studies and presents new data which, together, emphasize the need for improvements in NIRS technology. Instrument designers need to be aware of the need for these improvements if NIRS is to serve clinicians better during research designed to rationally define clinical management protocols.
Andrew J. Macnab, Roy E. Gagnon, Faith A. Gagnon, "Unresolved Instrumentation Problems Following Clinical Trials Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy," Journal of Biomedical Optics 3(4), (1 October 1998). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.429847
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KEYWORDS
Near infrared spectroscopy

Electromagnetic coupling

Spectroscopy

Brain

Clinical trials

Fiber optics

Chromophores

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