1 April 2003 Effects of treatment protocols and subcutaneous implantation on bovine pericardium: a Raman spectroscopy study
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Using Raman microspectroscopy, we have studied mineral deposition on bovine pericardia, fixed according to three different protocols and either implanted subcutaneously or not implanted (controls). A lightly carbonated apatitic phosphate mineral, similar to that found in bone tissue, was deposited on the surface of a glutaraldehyde-fixed, implanted pericardium. Implanted pericardia fixed in glutaraldehyde followed by treatment in either an 80% ethanol or a 5% octanol/40% ethanol solution did not mineralize on implantation. Collagen secondary structure changes were observed on glutaraldehyde fixation by monitoring the center of gravity of the amide I envelope. It is proposed that the decrease in the amide I center of gravity frequency for the glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue compared to the nonfixed tissue is due to an increase in nonreducible collagen cross-links (1660 cm–1) and a decrease in reducible cross-links (1690 cm–1). The amide I center of gravity in the glutaraldehyde/ethanol-fixed pericardium was higher than the glutaraldehyde-fixed tissue center of gravity. This increase in center of gravity could possibly be due to a decrease in hydrogen bonding within the collagen fibrils following the ethanol pretreatment. In addition, we found a secondary structure change to the pericardial collagen after implantation: an increase in the frequency of the center of gravity of amide I is indicative of an increase in cross-links.
© (2003) Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Catherine Perso Tarnowski, Shona Stewart, Kellie Holder, Lori Campbell-Clark, R. J. Thoma, Alan K. Adams, Mark A. Moore, Michael D. Morris, "Effects of treatment protocols and subcutaneous implantation on bovine pericardium: a Raman spectroscopy study," Journal of Biomedical Optics 8(2), (1 April 2003). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.1559729 . Submission:
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top