12 July 2017 Utah optrode array customization using stereotactic brain atlases and 3-D CAD modeling for optogenetic neocortical interrogation in small rodents and nonhuman primates
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Abstract
As the optogenetic field expands, the need for precise targeting of neocortical circuits only grows more crucial. This work demonstrates a technique for using Solidworks® computer-aided design (CAD) and readily available stereotactic brain atlases to create a three-dimensional (3-D) model of the dorsal region of area visual cortex 4 (V4D) of the macaque monkey (Macaca fascicularis) visual cortex. The 3-D CAD model of the brain was used to customize an 8×6 Utah optrode array (UOA) after it was determined that a high-density (13×13) UOA caused extensive damage to marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) primary visual cortex as assessed by electrophysiological recording of spiking activity through a 1.5-mm-diameter through glass via. The 8×6 UOA was customized for optrode length (400  μm), optrode width (≤100  μm), optrode pitch (400  μm), backplane thickness (500  μm), and overall form factor (3.45  mm×2.65  mm). Two 8×6 UOAs were inserted into layer VI of macaque V4D cortices with minimal damage as assessed in fixed tissue cytochrome oxidase staining in nonrecoverable surgeries. Additionally, two 8×6 arrays were implanted in mice (Mus musculus) motor cortices, providing early evidence for long-term tolerability (over 6 months), and for the ability to integrate the UOA with a Holobundle light delivery system toward patterned optogenetic stimulation of cortical networks.
© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Ronald W. Boutte, Sam Merlin, Guy Yona, Brandon Griffiths, Alessandra Angelucci, Itamar Kahn, Shy Shoham, Steve Blair, "Utah optrode array customization using stereotactic brain atlases and 3-D CAD modeling for optogenetic neocortical interrogation in small rodents and nonhuman primates," Neurophotonics 4(4), 041502 (12 July 2017). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.4.4.041502 . Submission: Received: 31 March 2017; Accepted: 8 June 2017
Received: 31 March 2017; Accepted: 8 June 2017; Published: 12 July 2017
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