16 October 2017 Using prerecorded hemodynamic response functions in detecting prefrontal pain response: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study
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Abstract
Currently, there is no method for providing a nonverbal objective assessment of pain. Recent work using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has revealed its potential for objective measures. We conducted two fNIRS scans separated by 30 min and measured the hemodynamic response to the electrical noxious and innocuous stimuli over the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) in 14 subjects. Based on the estimated hemodynamic response functions (HRFs), we first evaluated the test–retest reliability of using fNIRS in measuring the pain response over the aPFC. We then proposed a general linear model (GLM)-based detection model that employs the subject-specific HRFs from the first scan to detect the pain response in the second scan. Our results indicate that fNIRS has a reasonable reliability in detecting the hemodynamic changes associated with noxious events, especially in the medial portion of the aPFC. Compared with a standard HRF with a fixed shape, including the subject-specific HRFs in the GLM allows for a significant improvement in the detection sensitivity of aPFC pain response. This study supports the potential application of individualized analysis in using fNIRS and provides a robust model to perform objective determination of pain perception.
© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Ke Peng, Ke Peng, Meryem A. Yücel, Meryem A. Yücel, Christopher M. Aasted, Christopher M. Aasted, Sarah C. Steele, Sarah C. Steele, David A. Boas, David A. Boas, David Borsook, David Borsook, Lino Becerra, Lino Becerra, } "Using prerecorded hemodynamic response functions in detecting prefrontal pain response: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study," Neurophotonics 5(1), 011018 (16 October 2017). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.5.1.011018 . Submission: Received: 6 April 2017; Accepted: 26 September 2017
Received: 6 April 2017; Accepted: 26 September 2017; Published: 16 October 2017
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