1 April 2000 Effect of surface oxyfluorination on the bonding between acrylic coated optical fiber and cementitious and polyester resin matrices
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Optical Engineering, 39(4), (2000). doi:10.1117/1.602450
Abstract
We examine the effect of fiber surface oxyfluorination on the interfacial bonding between acrylic coated optical fiber and a cementitious matrix and polyester resin respectively. The optical fiber is surface oxyfluorinated through a gas reaction process at room temperature in which elemental oxygen and fluorine are introduced into the acrylic molecular chain to replace the hydrogen atoms partially. After surface fluo- rination, the wettability of the optical fiber improves. Through an optical fiber embedment pull-out test, it is found that the surface oxyfluorination treatment improves on average the adhesional shear bond strength between the optical fiber and the cementitious matrix by 22% and the interfacial bonding between the optical fiber and the polyester resin matrix by 66%. The debonding of the unmodified optical fiber and the polyester matrix exhibits catastrophic failure characteristics, whereas that of the oxyfluorinated optical fiber with the polyester matrix is more gradual and there is still a substantial bond at the interface after the interfacial adhesive bond is broken. The mechanisms for the increase in interfacial bonding between the oxyfluorinated acrylic coated optical fiber and the cementitious and polyester resin matrices are proposed.
Pieter L. Swart, Lin Tu, Anatoli A. Chtcherbakov, "Effect of surface oxyfluorination on the bonding between acrylic coated optical fiber and cementitious and polyester resin matrices," Optical Engineering 39(4), (1 April 2000). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.602450
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KEYWORDS
Optical fibers

Cements

Fluorine

Adhesives

Polymers

Fiber optics sensors

Chemical species

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