1 September 2000 Noninvasive blood flow measurement using speckle signals from a self-mixing laser diode: in vitro and in vivo experiments
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Optical Engineering, 39(9), (2000). doi:10.1117/1.1287262
Abstract
A semiconductor laser speckle velocimeter that uses the selfmixing effect is studied for noninvasive relative blood flow measurements. The random modulation of intensity and spectra of the laser diode caused by the backcoupling of the scattered light from the red blood cells into the laser cavity is detected as a speckle signal with a photodiode inside the laser package. The autocorrelation of this self-mixing speckle signal gives information on the flow velocity of the blood. The proposed method is elucidated with in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these measurements are given together with a discussion of dependence of speckle signal of a self-mixing laser diode (SMLD) on various parameters such as velocity, hematocrit level of blood, and background reflectance of blood suspension.
Sahin Kaya Ozdemir, Shigenobu Shinohara, Sotetsu Takamiya, Hirofumi Yoshida, "Noninvasive blood flow measurement using speckle signals from a self-mixing laser diode: in vitro and in vivo experiments," Optical Engineering 39(9), (1 September 2000). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1287262
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KEYWORDS
Blood

Speckle

Blood circulation

Semiconductor lasers

Reflectors

In vitro testing

In vivo imaging

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