1 June 2010 Design of double-coated optical fibers to minimize microbending losses caused by hydrostatic-pressure-induced creep deformation of polymeric coatings
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Abstract
The design of double-coated optical fibers to minimize hydrostatic-pressure-induced microbending losses caused by creep deformation of polymeric coatings is investigated. The hydrostatic-pressure-induced stresses in optical fibers are derived from the viscoelastic behavior of commercial polymeric coatings. Microbending loss in these fibers is dominated by compressive radial stress at the interface between the glass fiber and the primary coating, which is a function of the material properties of the polymeric coatings and their thickness. To minimize these losses in double-coated optical fibers, one should diminish the Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, and relaxation time of the primary coating as well as the strain ratio of the secondary coating, but should raise the strain ratio of the primary coating and the radius, Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, and relaxation time of the secondary coating. The radius of the primary coating possesses an optimum value.
© (2010) Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Meng-Lun Hsueh, Meng-Lun Hsueh, Bing-Yuh Lu, Bing-Yuh Lu, Fok-Ching Chong, Fok-Ching Chong, Sham-Tsong Shiue, Sham-Tsong Shiue, } "Design of double-coated optical fibers to minimize microbending losses caused by hydrostatic-pressure-induced creep deformation of polymeric coatings," Optical Engineering 49(6), 065006 (1 June 2010). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3454386 . Submission:
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