8 October 2014 Segmented subwavelength silicon gratings manufactured by high productivity microelectronic technologies for linear to radial/azimuthal polarization conversion
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Optical Engineering, 53(10), 107105 (2014). doi:10.1117/1.OE.53.10.107105
Abstract
A polarization rotation is realized by subwavelength binary gratings, where the round trip phases of the smallest grating modes are fixed to the smallest possible integer numbers of allowing a phase difference of π between TE and TM polarizations and almost 100% transmission. The principle is applied to a polarization transformation in the 1030 to 1064-nm wavelength range, using a segmented polarization rotating element converting a linearly polarized incidence to a radial or azimuthal polarization distribution. The elevated costs of such kinds of polarization transformers based on assembled birefringent crystals are avoided by using mass-fabrication compatible silicon-on-insulator technology on a wafer scale. It shows the general potential of microelectronic technology, concerning the batch manufacturing of wavelength-scale diffractive, grating-based elements for processing free space waves.
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Thomas Kämpfe, Pierre Sixt, Denis Renaud, Armelle Lagrange, Fabrice Perrin, Olivier Parriaux, "Segmented subwavelength silicon gratings manufactured by high productivity microelectronic technologies for linear to radial/azimuthal polarization conversion," Optical Engineering 53(10), 107105 (8 October 2014). http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.53.10.107105
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KEYWORDS
Polarization

Silicon

Microelectronics

Photomasks

Semiconducting wafers

Prototyping

Transformers

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