23 January 2018 Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based visible light communication systems using a modified partial transmit sequence technique
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
We propose an efficient partial transmit sequence technique based on genetic algorithm and peak-value optimization algorithm (GAPOA) to reduce high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in visible light communication systems based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (VLC-OFDM). By analysis of hill-climbing algorithm’s pros and cons, we propose the POA with excellent local search ability to further process the signals whose PAPR is still over the threshold after processed by genetic algorithm (GA). To verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique and algorithm, we evaluate the PAPR performance and the bit error rate (BER) performance and compare them with partial transmit sequence (PTS) technique based on GA (GA-PTS), PTS technique based on genetic and hill-climbing algorithm (GH-PTS), and PTS based on shuffled frog leaping algorithm and hill-climbing algorithm (SFLAHC-PTS). The results show that our technique and algorithm have not only better PAPR performance but also lower computational complexity and BER than GA-PTS, GH-PTS, and SFLAHC-PTS technique.
© 2018 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Yan Liu, Yan Liu, Honggui Deng, Honggui Deng, Shuang Ren, Shuang Ren, Chengying Tang, Chengying Tang, Xuewen Qian, Xuewen Qian, } "Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based visible light communication systems using a modified partial transmit sequence technique," Optical Engineering 57(1), 016108 (23 January 2018). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.57.1.016108 . Submission: Received: 16 August 2017; Accepted: 27 December 2017
Received: 16 August 2017; Accepted: 27 December 2017; Published: 23 January 2018
JOURNAL ARTICLE
10 PAGES


SHARE
RELATED CONTENT

Gaussian mutation in evolution strategies
Proceedings of SPIE (March 24 1998)
Bone segmentation using multiple communicating snakes
Proceedings of SPIE (May 14 2003)

Back to Top