Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems

Editor-in-Chief: Mark Clampin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

The Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS) covers development, testing, and application of telescopes, instrumentation, techniques, and systems for ground- and space-based astronomy.

Call For Papers
How to Submit a Manuscript

Regular papers: Submissions of regular papers are always welcome.

Special section papers: Open calls for papers are listed below. A cover letter indicating that the submission is intended for a particular special section should be included with the paper.

To submit a paper, please prepare the manuscript according to the journal guidelines and use the online submission systemLeaving site. All papers will be peer‐reviewed in accordance with the journal's established policies and procedures. Authors have the choice to publish with open access.

Detectors for Astronomy and Cosmology
Publication Date
Vol. 5, Issue 4
Submission Deadline
Closed for submissions.
Guest Editors
Shouleh Nikzad

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Pasadena, California, USA
shouleh.nikzad@jpl.nasa.gov

Erika Hamden

University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona, USA
hamden@email.arizona.edu

Michael Hoenk

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Pasadena, California, USA
michael.e.hoenk@jpl.nasa.gov

John MacKenty

Space Telescope Science Institute
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
mackenty@stsci.edu

Andrei Nomerotski

Brookhaven National Laboratory
Upton, New York, USA
anomerotski@bnl.gov

Chaz Shapiro

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Pasadena, California, USA
charles.a.shapiro@jpl.nasa.gov

Roger Smith

Caltech
Pasadena, California, USA
rsmith@astro.caltech.edu

Scope

There are exciting opportunities in astronomy both in ground and space-based telescopes. New capabilities are coming online, and the community is gearing up for the next decadal survey. Four flagship missions are under concept study funded by NASA in preparation for inputs into the next decadal survey. The interim report of these missions suggests detector needs with various degrees of required development. Additionally, future missions require advanced characterization in order to fully harness the capabilities of detectors both novel and mature.
At the same time, exciting developments are taking place in detector innovation and maturity. WFIRST is taking silicon-based photon-counting detectors such as electron multiplying CCDs to new levels of maturity. New concepts for photon counting are being developed. For example, the quanta image sensor and linear mode mercury cadmium telluride-based avalanche photodiode arrays continue to make progress in photon counting in the infrared spectral range. CMOS-based scientific detectors are making rapid advancements in development and mission infusion. Furthermore, mature detectors such as HxRGs and deep depletion CCDs are being tested with realistic data to minimize systematic limitations.
It is timely to take stock of the status of detectors at hand, canvas the field for up-and-coming technologies, and also assess the needs of the future and take measure of the technology gaps. The purpose of this special section is to capture this information in one place to aid the development of future instruments and missions based on new capabilities.

Related topics of interest include but are not limited to:

• Detectors in UV/Optical/NIR
• Detectors in novel architectures and designs or materials
• Detectors in Silicon, III-N, Oxides, MCT, III-V, II-VI, etc.
• Detectors for precision astronomy
• Characterization
• In-flight performance predictions and modeling
• System level performance and modeling
• Suborbital performance
• Radiation and other environmental testing

This special section focuses on detectors, their innovation, and their impact on instrumentation and missions—near term and long term. All submissions will be peer reviewed. Peer review will commence immediately upon manuscript submission. Once the special section is opened online, each paper will be published as soon as the copyedited and typeset proofs are approved by the author. Manuscripts should be submitted online at https://JATIS.msubmit.net. A cover letter indicating that the submission is intended for this special section should be included.

Image Credit: ZTF Caltech, Courtesy of Michael Feeney
Starshades
Publication Date
Vol. 7, Issue 1
Submission Deadline
1 June 2020
Guest Editors
Jonathan W. Arenberg

Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems
Redondo Beach, California, USA
jon.arenberg@ngc.com

Anthony Harness

Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, USA
anthony.harness@princeton.edu 

Rebecca Jensen-Clem

University of California
Santa Cruz, California, USA 
rjensenc@ucsc.edu

Scope

The starshade has emerged as a viable technology for the observation and characterization of exoplanets. Since the inception of the starshade, the field has developed rapidly, and the advances are widely spread in the literature and hard to find. This special section of JATIS is intended to provide a centralized contemporary reference for this exciting and capable technology.

The topics of interest for this special section are as follows:

  • Error budgeting
  • Starshade-based missions (at all scales)
  • Performance modeling
  • Other science enabled by starshades, specifically non-exoplanet missions
  • Data processing, the reduction of starshade images to science data
  • Optical modeling
  • Optics of starshades
  • Testing and verification of starshades
  • Mission planning
  • Image postprocessing
  • Instrument design for use with a starshade
  • Petal edge and face scattering
  • Scaling rules
  • Testing and verification
  • Design (apodization) optimization of the starshade
  • Formation sensing, maintenance and operations


To submit a manuscript for consideration in the special section, please prepare the manuscript according to the journal guidelines and submit the paper via the online submission system. A cover letter indicating that the submission is intended for this special section should be included with the paper. Manuscripts published in the Proceedings of SPIE are welcome for submission to this special section after proper revision to meet the standards of a journal publication. Regular submissions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the journal's established policies and procedures.

The guest editors are also seeking for comprehensive review papers in the areas listed above. Authors interested in submitting a review paper to this special section should contact the guest editors with a brief proposal of the paper.

Published Special Sections

Detectors for Astronomy and Cosmology, Part 1 (October-December 2019)
Guest Editors: Shouleh Nikzad, Erika Hamden, Michael Hoenk, John MacKenty, Andrei Nomerotski, Chaz Shapiro, Roger Smith
 
The Lynx X-Ray Observatory
(April-June 2019)
Guest Editors: Alexey Vikhlinin, Feryal Özel, Jessica Gaskin, Douglas Swartz

The Hitomi X-Ray Observatory, Part 2
(April-June 2018)
Guest Editors: Richard L. Kelley and Kazuhiro Nakazawa

The Hitomi X-Ray Observatory, Part 1 (January-March 2018)
Guest Editors: Richard L. Kelley and Kazuhiro Nakazawa

Polarimetry in X- and Gamma-Ray Astronomy: the Ultimate Dimension (January-March 2018)
Guest Editors: Stanley Hunter and Ezio Caroli

Future Large-Aperture Ultraviolet/Optical/Infrared Space Observatory (October-December 2016)
Guest Editors: Harley Thronson, Avi Mandell, Ron Polidan, and Jason Tumlinson

WFIRST-AFTA Coronagraphs (January-March 2016)
Guest Editors: Olivier Guyon and Motohide Tamura

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