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14 May 2020 In situ detection of gas chromatography analytes by active illumination with quantum cascade lasers
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Abstract

Gas chromatography (GC) is a staple analytical technique used to separate chemical mixtures (analytes) prior to identification with a hyphenated technique, such as mass spectrometry or Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Traditionally, analytes elute through the GC separation column where they are detected when they exit. We have developed a technique to perform in situ IR spectroscopy during the process of separating the analytes along the GC column. This is achieved by spin coating the stationary phase onto a germanium prism and actively probing the stationary phase in an attenuated total reflectance configuration with a quantum cascade laser.. The GC column is formed by pressing a molded epoxy lid, with grooves that form the tubular column, onto the stationary phase coated prism.

© 2020 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) 0091-3286/2020/$28.00 © 2020 SPIE
Christopher J. Breshike, Robert Furstenberg, Tyler J. Huffman, Dmitry A. Kozak, Todd H. Stievater, and R. Andrew McGill "In situ detection of gas chromatography analytes by active illumination with quantum cascade lasers," Optical Engineering 59(9), 092004 (14 May 2020). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.59.9.092004
Received: 28 February 2020; Accepted: 1 May 2020; Published: 14 May 2020
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