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22 June 2022 Visualizing quantum mechanics in an interactive simulation – Virtual Lab by Quantum Flytrap
Piotr Migdał, Klementyna Jankiewicz, Paweł Grabarz, Chiara Decaroli, Philippe Cochin
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KEYWORDS
Visualization

Photons

Quantum mechanics

Particles

Quantum computing

Computer simulations

Optical engineering

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