Prof. Michel J. F. Digonnet
Professor of Applied Physics at Stanford Univ
SPIE Involvement:
Conference Program Committee | Conference Chair | Track Chair | Editor | Author | Instructor
Publications (107)

SPIE Conference Volume | 7 June 2019

Proceedings Article | 4 March 2019
Proc. SPIE. 10936, Photonic Heat Engines: Science and Applications
KEYWORDS: Multimode fibers, Optical fibers, Sensors, Luminescence, Single mode fibers, Ytterbium, ZBLAN, Absorption

Proceedings Article | 4 March 2019
Proc. SPIE. 10934, Optical, Opto-Atomic, and Entanglement-Enhanced Precision Metrology
KEYWORDS: Resonators, Lasers, Fiber optic gyroscopes, Sensors, Distortion, Laser resonators, Optical resonators, Gyroscopes, Resonance enhancement

Proceedings Article | 1 March 2019
Proc. SPIE. 10936, Photonic Heat Engines: Science and Applications
KEYWORDS: Optical fibers, Silica, Sensors, Nanoparticles, Luminescence, Ions, Ytterbium, Silicates, ZBLAN

Proceedings Article | 1 March 2019
Proc. SPIE. 10936, Photonic Heat Engines: Science and Applications
KEYWORDS: Oxides, Cladding, Luminescence, Ions, Chalcogenides, Fiber lasers, Ytterbium, Erbium, Absorption

Proceedings Article | 11 June 2018
Proc. SPIE. 10550, Optical and Electronic Cooling of Solids III
KEYWORDS: Optical fibers, Fiber Bragg gratings, Sensors, Luminescence, Fiber lasers, Fiber optics sensors, Temperature sensors, Spatial resolution, Signal detection, Temperature metrology

Showing 5 of 107 publications
Conference Committee Involvement (34)
Optical Components and Materials XVII
1 February 2020 | San Francisco, California, United States
Photonic Heat Engines: Science and Applications II
1 February 2020 | San Francisco, California, United States
Optical Components and Materials XVI
4 February 2019 | San Francisco, California, United States
Optical Components and Materials XV
29 January 2018 | San Francisco, California, United States
Optical Components and Materials XIV
30 January 2017 | San Francisco, California, United States
Showing 5 of 34 published special sections
Course Instructor
SC228: Fiber Laser Sources and Amplifiers for Lightwave System Applications
Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers have revolutionized the field of optical communications. Amplifiers allow propagating multiple-wavelength light signals modulated at extremely high bit rates along fibers thousands of kilometers long. Fiber lasers provide coherent light emission in wavelength regions (ultraviolet to mid-infrared) and with power and coherence properties not available from diode lasers. This course describes the spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped glass fibers, the operating principles of the laser and amplifier devices based on these fibers, and the basic mathematical models that describe their performance. It also provides a broad overview of the different types of fiber lasers and amplifiers, as well as detailed descriptions of cornerstone devices, such as Er-doped fiber amplifiers, Raman fiber amplifiers, and high-power Yb-doped and Nd-doped fiber master-oscillator power amplifiers. The performance and characteristics of numerous representative devices are reviewed, including the configuration, threshold, conversion efficiency, and polarization behavior of fiber lasers, and the pumping schemes, gain, noise, and polarization dependence of fiber amplifiers.
SC984: Fiber Amplifiers
Rare-earth-doped fiber amplifiers have revolutionized the field of optical communications. Amplifiers allow propagating multiple-wavelength light signals modulated at extremely high bit rates along fibers thousands of kilometers long. This functionality has revolutionized the way we communicate, in particular by making the fast Internet an economical reality. This course describes the spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped glass fibers, the principles of the amplifiers based on these fibers, and basic mathematical models describing their operation. It also provides a broad overview of Raman fiber amplifiers. The performance of representative experimental devices is reviewed, including the configuration, pumping schemes, gain, efficiency, gain saturation, noise, and polarization dependence.
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