Dr. Robert A. Fisher
at RA Fisher Associates LLC
SPIE Involvement:
Board of Directors | Education Committee | Scholarship Committee | Fellow status | Conference Chair | Track Chair | Author | Instructor
Publications (7)

Proceedings Article | 19 October 2000
Proc. SPIE. 4110, Photorefractive Fiber and Crystal Devices: Materials, Optical Properties, and Applications VI
KEYWORDS: Refractive index, Optical amplifiers, Polarization, Energy transfer, Crystals, Polarizers, Optical testing, Nonlinear optics, Two wave mixing, Phase shifts

SPIE Conference Volume | 1 April 1992

SPIE Conference Volume | 1 June 1991

SPIE Conference Volume | 1 May 1990

SPIE Conference Volume | 22 April 1988

Showing 5 of 7 publications
Conference Committee Involvement (6)
Nonlinear Optics III
20 January 1992 | Los Angeles, CA, United States
Nonlinear Optics
23 January 1991 | Los Angeles, CA, United States
Nonlinear Optics
18 January 1990 | Los Angeles, CA, United States
Nonlinear Optical Beam Manipulation and High Energy Beam Propagation Through the Atmosphere
15 January 1989 | Los Angeles, CA, United States
Nonlinear Optical Beam Manipulation, Beam Combining, and Atmospheric Propagation
11 January 1988 | Los Angeles, CA, United States
Showing 5 of 6 published special sections
Course Instructor
SC047: Introduction to Nonlinear Optics
This introductory-level course provides the basic concepts of bulk media nonlinear optics. Although some mathematical formulas are provided, the emphasis is on simple explanations. It is recognized that the beginning practitioner in nonlinear optics is overwhelmed by a constellation of complicated nonlinear optical effects, including second-harmonic generation, optical Kerr effect, self-focusing, self-phase modulation, self-steepening, fiber-optic solitons, chirping, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, and photorefractive phenomena. It is our job in this course to demystify this daunting collection of seemingly unrelated effects by developing simple and clear explanations for how each works, and learning how each effect can be used for the modification, manipulation, or conversion of light pulses. Where possible, examples will address the nonlinear optical effects that occur inside optical fibers. Also covered are examples in liquids, bulk solids, and gases.
SC206: Polarized Light: A Practical Hands-on Introduction
Covering introductory and intermediate topics in polarized light, simple explanations, and concepts are the emphasis of this hands-on course. There are demonstrations, and each participant receives two linear polarizers, a circular polarizer, a quarter-wave plate and a half-wave plate. Topics include: linear polarizers, mechanical strains, birefringence, orthogonality, circular polarization, matrices, reflective properties, practical applications, optical activity, and Faraday rotation. The goal of the course is that each participant retains a sound grasp of each concept, and the use of mathematics is kept to a minimum. Attendees learn to appreciate a light beam's "polarization degree of freedom," and how to use polarization-modifying elements to convert a beam's state of polarization from one form to another.
SC040: Gratings, Monochromators, and Spectrometers
This course introduces gratings, monochromator, and spectrometer operations to the novice. Using a minimum of mathematics, this course provides the fundamental concepts necessary to the successful implementation of these frequency-selective devices. The differing frequency scales (gigahertz, Angstroms, inverse centimeters, nanometers, microns, etc.) are described and compared. The basic operation of gratings is reviewed, including issues of blaze, holographic gratings, backlash, and resolving power. The implementation of gratings into spectrometers and monochromators are addressed. The Fabry Perot device is discussed, emphasizing its use for laser frequency analysis. Other spectral analyzing interferometers are explained, including the Michelson and the Fizeau.
SC007: Filters and Polarizers
This course introduces beginner to the operation of filters (spectrally selective and neutral density) and the operation of polarization modifying or controlling optics. The course uses a minimum of mathematics, relying on providing the fundamental concepts necessary to the successful understanding of these frequency- or polarization-selective devices. You learn selection and implementation of filters, including proper treatment of fluorescence and stray beams. The polarization degree of freedom of a light beam, and how to use polarization modifying elements to convert the beam's state of polarization are explained. You learn to measure the state of polarization of a beam. Commercial providers are identified.
SC325: An Introduction to Lasers
This course introduces the enabling technology of lasers to those having little to no prior knowledge. We use a minimum of mathematics, relying instead on simple pictures to explain the principles of laser action, laser modes, mode-locking, single-longitudinal mode operation (SLM), the MOPA (Master-Oscillator, Power-Amplifier), Q-switched operation, etc. We review the unusual features of laser light, namely the potential narrow-band properties and the ability to focus a laser beam to a very small and intense spot. The various laser types are discussed. Each topic is explained in simple terms with an emphasis on underlying physical principles and a minimum of mathematics. References and materials are identified.
SC411: Nonlinear Optics for Fiber Optic Communication: An Introduction
This introductory-level course provides the basic concepts of fiber-optic nonlinear optics. It is recognized that the beginning practitioner in fiber-optic communication is overwhelmed by a constellation of complicated nonlinear optical effects, including self-phase modulation, chirping, Raman amplification, self-steepening, Brillouin amplification, second-harmonic generation in fibers, optical parametric fiber amplification, 4-wave mixing, cross-phase modulation, solitons, stimulated Brillouin fiber lasers, stimulated Raman Fiber lasers, channel shifters, forward phase conjugators, and other Quasi-Phase Matched (QPM) devices. This course will develop simple and clear explanations for how each works, and demonstrate how each effect can be used for the modification, manipulation, or conversion of light pulses. Although some mathematical formalism is provided, the emphasis is on simple explanations for how things work.
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