Dr. Russell A. Chipman
Professor of Optical Sciences at College of Optical Sciences Univ of Arizona
SPIE Involvement:
Board of Directors | Fellow status | Conference Program Committee | Conference Chair | Author | Editor | Instructor
Publications (127)

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | September 6, 2017
Proc. SPIE. 10374, Optical Modeling and Performance Predictions IX
KEYWORDS: Exoplanets, Polarization, Performance modeling, Mirrors, Optical design, Birefringence, Diffraction, Coating, Thin films, Statistical analysis

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | August 30, 2017
Proc. SPIE. 10407, Polarization Science and Remote Sensing VIII
KEYWORDS: Polarization, Remote sensing, Reflectivity, Visible radiation, Agriculture, Reflection, Infrared imaging, Infrared radiation, Analytical research

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | August 30, 2017
Proc. SPIE. 10407, Polarization Science and Remote Sensing VIII
KEYWORDS: Polarimetry, Polarization, Systems modeling, Imaging systems, Polarization analysis, Thermal effects, Optical design, Algorithm development, Optical components, Crystal optics

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | July 29, 2016
Proc. SPIE. 9904, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
KEYWORDS: Polarization, Mirrors, Point spread functions, Dielectric polarization, Telescopes, Exoplanets, Coronagraphy, Image acquisition, Diffraction, Space telescopes

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | May 4, 2016
Proc. SPIE. 9853, Polarization: Measurement, Analysis, and Remote Sensing XII
KEYWORDS: Polarimetry, Polarization, Spatial frequencies, Imaging systems, Cameras, Spectrum analysis, Environmental sensing, Polarimetry, Scattering, RGB color model, Fourier transforms

PROCEEDINGS ARTICLE | March 18, 2016
Proc. SPIE. 9776, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography VII
KEYWORDS: Polarization, Multilayers, Thin film coatings, Extreme ultraviolet lithography, Optical coatings, Point spread functions, Scanners, Ray tracing, Diffraction, Extreme ultraviolet, Mirrors, Silicon, Molybdenum, 3D modeling

Showing 5 of 127 publications
Conference Committee Involvement (29)
Optical Modeling and Performance Predictions X
19 August 2018 | San Diego, California, United States
Polarization Science and Remote Sensing VIII
8 August 2017 | San Diego, California, United States
Optical Modeling and Performance Predictions IX
8 August 2017 | San Diego, California, United States
Optical Modeling and Performance Predictions VIII
1 September 2016 | San Diego, California, United States
Polarization Science and Remote Sensing VII
11 August 2015 | San Diego, California, United States
Showing 5 of 29 published special sections
Course Instructor
SC792: Polarization in Optical Design
This course provides a survey of issues associated with calculating polarization effects in optical systems using optical design programs. Many optical systems are polarization critical and require careful attention to polarization issues. Such systems include liquid crystal projectors, imaging with active laser illumination, very high numerical aperture optical systems in microlithography and data storage, DVD players, imaging into tissue and turbid media, optical coherence tomography, and interferometers. Polarization effects are complex: retardance has three degrees of freedom, diattenuation (partial polarization) has three degrees of freedom, and depolarization, the coupling of polarized into partially polarized light, has nine degrees of freedom. Due to this complexity, polarization components and the polarization performance of optical systems are rarely completely specified. The polarization aberrations introduced by thin films and uniaxial crystals can be readily evaluated in several commercial optical design codes. These routines are complex and most optical engineers are unfamiliar with the capabilities and the forms of output. But these polarization ray tracing routines provide better methods to communicate polarization performance and specifications between different groups teamed on complex optical problems. Better means of technical communication speed the development of complex systems.
SC328: Polarization in WDM Fiber Systems
This course provides an overview of polarization issues in high-speed fiber systems. Practical descriptions are provided for all the polarization properties: retardance, diattenuation (polarization dependent loss), and depolarization. Polarimetric methods for characterizing fiber components and systems as polarization elements are presented. For those seeking additional preparation in polarization, SC206 <i>A Practical Introduction to Polarized Light</i> by Robert A. Fisher and SC530 <i>Polarization for Engineers<i> by Russell Chipman introduce the concepts used in this course.
SC208: Polarizers, Retarders, and Depolarizers
This course is an overview of polarization elements and properties of optical components. Practical descriptions are provided for retardance, diattenuation (polarization dependent loss), and depolarization. Polarizers and retarders are introduced and their principal uses explained. Polarimetric methods for measuring polarization elements are presented and described in detail with examples from experimental studies. The nonideal properties of polarization elements are discussed with particular emphasis on the properties of polarizing beam splitters based on experimental studies. Methods for depolarizing light are covered in detail. Course SC206, "A Practical Introduction to Polarized Light", R. Fisher provides an excellent background for this course.
SC530: Polarization for Engineers
This course provides an introductory survey of polarization from an engineering perspective. The emphasis is on the practical aspects of polarization elements needed to design and understand optical systems and polarization measurements. The basic mathematics of the Jones calculus, Poincare sphere, Stokes vectors, and Mueller matrices are presented and applied to describe polarized light and polarization elements. Practical descriptions and measurement methods are provided for all the polarization properties. Polarizers and retarders are introduced and their principal uses explained. The nonideal characteristics of polarization elements are discussed with examples. Methods for depolarizing light with depolarizers are covered. Familiarity with basic linear algebra (i. e. matrix multiplication) is assumed.
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